Montréal 2017

Gerhard Schulz

Gerhard Schulz

Born in Austria into a family of musicians, Gerhard Schulz studied violin with Franz Samohyl, Sándor Végh and Shmuel Ashkenasi. In 1972, upon the invitation of his mentor, Mr. Schulz attended Mr Végh’s violin Master Class at the first Interna-tional Musicians’ Seminar in Prussia Cove, England, which had an invaluable impact on his life as a chamber musician.

Founder of several chamber music groups, including the Salzburg String Trio, the Düsseldorf String Quartet and the Waldstein Ensemble, M. Schultz was also the Concertmaster of the Illinois Chamber Orchestra. Since 1978, he has been a member of the world famous Alban Berg Quartet with whom he toured worldwide and made several celebrated recordings.

Currently, M. Schulz is professor of violin at the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna and a professor of Chamber Music in Stuttgart.

Günter Pichler

Günter Pichler

Günter Pichler began his studies at the University of Music in Vienna in 1955. He was appointed Leader of the Vienna Symphonic Orchestra at eighteen years old, and three years later, Herbert von Karajan engaged him as Leader of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra.

In 1970, he founded the Alban Berg Quartett and has led this famous quartet ever since. Honorary member of the Vienna Konzerthaus Society as well as Associate Artists of the Royal Festival Hall London, the Alban Berg Quartett was rewarded with more than thirty renowned disc prizes.

Since 1963, M. Pichler has been Professor at the University of Music in Vienna, and since 1993 Guest Professor in Cologne. In 2007 he was appointed head of the Department for Chamber Music at the Escuela Superior de Música Reina Sophia in Madrid where he mentors many of the finest young European string quartets .

Michael Tree

Michael Tree

A founding member of both the famed Guarneri String Quartet and the Marlboro Trio, Michael Tree was born in Newark, New Jersey. He studied the violin with Efrem Zimbalist at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia.

Following a Carnegie Hall recital debut, he appeared as a soloist on both the violin and viola with major orchestras, including those of Philadelphia, Baltimore, Los Angeles, and his native New Jersey. As a chamber musician he has concertized throughout the world and recorded more than 80 chamber music masterpieces; prominent among them are ten piano quintets and quartets with Arthur Rubinstein. Mr. Tree serves on the faculties of The Juilliard School, Manhattan School of Music, the Curtis Institute, and the University of Maryland.

Mr. Tree plays a Domenicus Busan viola, dated 1750, from Venice or Hiroshi Iisuka, Philadelphia, dated 1996.

Paul Katz

Paul Katz

Following his studies with Gregor Piatigorsky, Janos Starker, Bernard Greenhouse and Leonard Rose, in 1969, Paul Katz co-founded the Cleveland Quartet. Playing more than 2,500 concerts worldwide, the CQ were the first classical artists to appear on the Grammy Awards Telecast and have also performed at the White House.

M. Katz has received many honors for his contributions to the world of cello playing and teaching: the "Chevalier du Violoncelle," of the Indiana University; the Richard M. Bogomolny National Service Award; an Honorary Doctorate of Musical Arts from Albright College; and the American String Teacher's Association "Artist-Teacher of the Year 2003."

In 2001, Paul Katz joined the New England Conservatory faculty and mentors many of the fine young cellists and string quartets on the world's stages today.

Andrew Watkinson

Andrew Watkinson

At the age of ten, Andrew Watkinson became one of the first pupils at the Yehudi Menuhin School and when sixteen, began four years of foreign study, first in Switzerland and then in Leningrad.

Andrew’s teachers included Joseph Szigeti and Franco Gulli. In 1976, Andrew won 2nd prize in the Carl Flesch Competition and started a frantic life of solo playing and freelancing in London. This became even more chaotic when the Endellion Quartet started in 1979.

For the first twenty years of the quartet’s existence Andrew also led and directed the City of London Sinfonia, as well as guest directing many of the London chamber orchestras, including the Academy of St Martin in the Fields, and continuing to play as a soloist.

David Waterman

David Waterman

David Waterman was born into a musical family in Leeds. He studied philosophy at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was awarded an MA and PhD degrees.

Founding member of the Endellion Quartet, his frequent collaborations with other artists have included appearances with members of the former Amadeus Quartet, Shmuel Ashkenasi, Joshua Bell, Lukacs Hagen, Steven Isserlis, Gabor Takacs-Nagy and Sandor Vegh. He was commissioned by Cambridge University Press to contribute a chapter to the “ Cambridge Companion to the String Quartet” which was published in 2003.

M. Waterman has taught at the Yehudi Menuhin School, the Royal Northern College of Music, the Royal Academy of Music, the Guildhall, and the Menuhin Academy at Gstaad and teaches cello and chamber music for IMS at Prussia Cove.

Garfield Jackson

Garfield Jackson

Garfield Jackson was born in London into a family of jazz trumpet players with a wide-ranging appreciation of music.

At the age of seven, Garfield had violin lessons by Beryl Morreau, who had been a viola student of Lionel Tertis and a founder member of the McNaghten String Quartet. After just eighteen months of tuition, Garfield was accepted as a pupil at the Yehudi Menuhin School, where he stayed for nine years. Garfield then entered the Royal Academy of Music on a scholarship.

Away from the Endellions, Garfield has always endeavoured to play chamber music with other friends and colleagues, including Sandor Vegh, Steven Isserlis, Joshua Bell, as well as many others. As a soloist, Garfield has performed at Wigmore Hall and The Queen Elizabeth Hall in London, given broadcasts for the BBC and made several recordings.

Ralph de Souza

Ralph de Souza

Ralph de Souza was born in Bombay and began violin lessons with his father, and later with Melbourne Halloween. At the age of ten, Ralph attended the Yehudi Menuhin School and then went to the Curtis Institute in the USA to study with Ivan Galamian and Jaime Laredo.

In 1977, Ralph won the Royal Overseas League Competition in London and in 1985, he spent the summer playing chamber music at Marlboro and became determined to turn to professional quartet-playing. By coincidence, very soon after, there came the phone call, which led him eventually to join the Endellion String Quartet in 1986.

Ralph has had a close association with the International Musicians' Seminar in Prussia Cove and has also returned to the Menuhin School for several years as a teacher.